Monday, July 8, 2013

Stenciled canvas vest and remade men's shirt combo

This post is about two garments.  I'm combining them because I wear them together and think they both look better as an outfit.  This makes for a long post which I promised not to do when I started this.  Hmm.. I'll have to work on that.  I'll talk about the shirt first.

I still have a bad crush on thrift store men's shirts.  Just when I say I'm never going to work with another one I get the urge.  

They are made so well that they are a hairball to take apart!  So, I've been thinking of ways that don't entail ripping out seams.  This shirt doesn't fall into that category because I made it before I swore off that method.  It was made with a traditional shirt that had a front placket typical of many men's shirts.  I didn't want that look so instead of cutting off the whole placket I cut into it in parts to create little patches in several spots.  Then I overstitched with perle cotton.  I added old buttons that were from my grandmother...she collected buttons.  More on that family saga in another post.

I sliced one layer of the collar off to create a raw edge, love those guys.  I then cut the hem so that it is shorter in the front and back, longer on the sides.  I added a wonderful subtle striped linen for a flounce in the front and a beautiful lightweight linen from a thrift find in the back.  I cut off the cuffs and hemmed the sleeves.  The collar has a bit of the stripped linen applied to tie it together.

Then I stenciled it with The Crafter's Workshop Brocade pattern.  I used Jacquard fabric paints blending a metallic grey with white to make it more subtle.  It's a fun look although a bit flouncy for me, hence the pairing with the more bold vest with black stripes.

OK, the vest.  I seem to have the fabric painting bug and can't shake it.  Never mind, it's fun and I'm branching out.  Here I used a lightweight canvas, sort of duck or really heavy muslin from Beverly's.  I masked it off with painter's tape and spray painted it with Liquitex Professional Spray Paint.  I love this stuff.  It has a bit of a hard hand but in this particular application it's fine.  Then I spray painted the same stencil with red.

I've been wanting to try Katherine Tilton's idea of making a vest out of Marcy Tilton's jacket pattern V8430, leaving off the sleeves.  She had a terrific article in the August/September 2009 issue of Threads Magazine about making vests with exposed seams.  

I added some top stitching to the exposed seams and a few pieces of striped fabric.  Then smacked a couple of pockets on...gotta have pockets.  Oh and in the end I splattered it with watery white fabric paint to make the whole thing feel like it comes together.  Don't ask me why I think it works but I do.

I LOVE the process of not planning a garment, just winging it and see what happens.  It's such a contrast to the pattern-following thing.  I love them both really.  As you'll see in my next post where I made a Lynn Mizono shirt...by the book!





                     You can see that I'm not too neat with the spray paint.  I like it that way.





Oh, and after I got the shirt done I found a stain on it!  Hate when that happens and it's a               chance you take with thrift store finds, they seem to show up even after washing.  So, I did an Alabama Chanin thing that you can see just a bit on the left sleeve above.



29 comments:

  1. What a beautiful duo, Gayle! I just love what you can do with men's shirts! And that vest is gorgeous. Very chic.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is gorgeous! Wish I could do something half that beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Utter knockout. Love. Love. Love.

    you know i've been in desperate need of some plain white blouses for the last few months, even a couple would make a huge difference in my wardrobe, but i've been completely unable to work up any enthusiasm.....

    ...until i saw what you did with this white shirt! the austere (unruffled) back flounce, the use of different fibres, the subtle stenciling - all of a sudden white tops sound a lot more fun!

    And how fantastic with the vest! Thank you and have fun, steph

    p.s. heehee, for me this would be a short post - look how long my flippin' comments get! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Funny, I was thinking the other day I should go to the thrift stores to get a couple men's shirts to wear outside when gardening... The pure cotton is so nice and I could be covered up and still comfortable/cool. You've taken this to a whole new level and I'm heading there first thing in the morning.

    Thanks for the inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love this, love your blog. Thank you. Rhonda M.

    ReplyDelete
  6. these pieces are great as separates....as an outfit: WOW!
    I am inspired!! Thank you.
    Helen

    ReplyDelete
  7. You are so talented; I never come out with something that fun from a thrift find.

    ReplyDelete
  8. What a great combo, love them both, nice work!....Anna

    ReplyDelete
  9. Fabulous Lagenlook-ish combo! Love your creativity!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love that shirt! The damaskish stencil has got my imagination running on overtime, I have no idea what I will do with it. Yet. You got another one running to the thrift store looking for white cotton shirts. 8-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Gayle - this is another wonderful ensemble! Thanks for sharing it. I do have a question about the man's shirt - how did you get the shoulders to fit so well? Did you buy a very small size shirt? I too am inspired to work with men's shirts, especially after DOL in June.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Martha,

    If I need to change the shoulders I re-cut the shirt. I have a cardboard sloper that fits me and use that. Using a cardboard pattern piece is the key to making it easy to cut an existing garment with all it's bumps and seams. It's a very simple shape, just half of a bodice with armholes. It works for front and back by changing the neckline as needed.

    It was made for tshirt fabrics so the front and back are the same piece but it works for this type of shirt that doesn't need to fit exactly.

    I first cut off the sleeves, then open the underarm seam by just cutting it away, lay the sleeves flat and then place the sleeve pattern on top and recut. I do the same with the body of the shirt. Lay it flat and button it. Then lay the pattern on top. The only thing I recut are the armholes.
    It's not exact but seems to work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gayle, thanks so much for this detail. I really appreciate it. Martha

      Delete
    2. Really good to know. Thanks so much!

      Delete
  13. I love your blog...everything you make. I discovered it this morning from Sham's blog. Thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you so much for posting pics of your fabulous shirt and vest. I found your blog through a link from Sham's blog and read every post. So inspirational. I had tried wearing thrift store men's shirts a few years ago around the house on the weekends and found the fit to be very uncomfortable. Thanks for the explanation to Martha about the cardboard pattern. I'm going to try that soon on a few white shirts-- then maybe get my scissors out! Elizabeth in Louisiana

    ReplyDelete
  15. Gayle, I found you on Marci Tilton. I love this shirt. Would you explain the draping process at the bottom of the shirt? I have one of Alisa Burke's books and have done a few things, but this vest has re-inspired me!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I started by cutting the hem in an arc so that it was shorter in the front and back and longer on the sides. I added rectangular pieces of cloth on each of the front two hems and the back hem. I then made godets on the side out of other cloth. Hope that's clear...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Woo! Hoo! I have started and can see it shaping up already. I'm using an old eyelet blouse that got too small, have added a font panel of pointelle sweater I had, and now adding the bottom pieces of one of my husband's old shirts (linen). Keep up the inspiration you are so good at!! BTW, I love the t-shirt remake with the cowl neck, just amazing color combo. Marsha in NC.

      Delete
  17. Hi Gayle, love what you are doing. I am another one who found you from Shams blog. I have a few wool sweaters that the bugs have had a bit. Was going to mend, but refashion might be the way to go.

    ReplyDelete
  18. this is really great linen shirts are really great for men. i always buy linen shirts from thestiffcollar.com. they offers best quality linen shirts in india

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thanks for this nice information On Linen Vests For Men. I really appreciate your work, keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I got bundle of information On Linen Vests For Men. This is first rate work.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wow! It's great work and really had great information in it's line.
    Great work indeed.
    Black Mens Vest | Cheap Mens Blazers

    ReplyDelete
  22. Useful information shared. I am very happy to read this article. Thanks for giving us nice info. Fantastic walk through. I appreciate this post.
    custom dress shirts online

    ReplyDelete
  23. Excellent site !! wonderful blog post.It is one of the most interest page in the net. I never expect that there are lots of contents that are useful to my assignment. Thank you so much guys

    weight training shirts

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi, just a moment back I was searching for the images on the Mens Linen Vests and now I am here. So much information, really well executed blog.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Thank you so much for sharing.sewing machine here I come.

    ReplyDelete